Florida Department of Corrections

Chaplaincy Services

Impact of Inmate Participation

In Chaplaincy Programs

 

††††† Jeb Bush††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Michael W. Moore

††††† Governor††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Secretary

 

 

 

Contents Ė Click Below to Go to Sections
†††† Chaplaincy Services:Preface by Chaplaincy Administrator Alex Taylor
†††† Introduction:Measuring Inmate Involvement & Consequences
††††††††† Gross Attendance
††††††††† Individual Inmate Participation Rate:A Better Measure
††††††††† Definition
~ This Report
†† Preliminary Conclusions
†††† Details
~Chapel Tracking:†† July ~ August ~ September
†††† Percentage of Inmate Participation by Region
†††† August 2001 Ė Variance by Institution Type
†††† Institutional Adjustment:Disciplinary Report Frequency
†††††† †††July
~August~September
†††† Statewide Measurement of Disciplinary Reports per 1,000 Inmates
†††† Statewide Participation by Program Type
†††† Conclusions

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State of Florida††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Contents~TOP

Department of Corrections

Chaplaincy Services

Attached you will find a copy of the Chaplaincy Services report on inmate participation rates for Chaplaincy programs.I want to express appreciation to all of those who contributed to this effort. A true joint effort made these figures available.A special thank you is appropriate to Bureau Chief, Dr. William Bales and the Bureau of Research and Data Analysis. Dr. John L. Lewis (Research and Data Analysis) provided excellent technical assistance in utilizing the information in the Offender Based Information System and continued his cooperation in this report by offering editorial and revision recommendations.

Richard Nimer, Director and Bernard Cohen, Deputy Director of the Office of Program, Transition and Post-release Services encourages statistical reporting and thorough data collection as part of effective evaluation.Their consistent encouragement was central to the completion of this report, which is intended to be a tool for assessment of religious program interest among inmates.It may also be applied to evaluation of individual Chaplaincy programs.

This report is a compilation of information retrieved from the institutional Chaplains.We are continuing to collect this information through monthly reports that are retrieved electronically via the Internet. Chaplain Harold Allison guided the pilot project where the data retrieval tool was developed and tested at six institutions across the State.Chaplain Douglas Gingerich took over the project in the fall of 2001 and has diligently provoked the field to submit accurate reports.Additionally, Chaplain Gingerich put together numerous charts of trends and statistics, many of which are included in this report.The narrative was co-written and edited by Dr. William Smith and Chaplain Alex Taylor.

 

 

Ch. Alex Taylor††††††††††††††††††††

Chaplaincy Services Administrator

 


IntroductionContents~TOP

Measuring Inmate Involvement and Its Consequences

Foreword

The primary function of the Chaplain for the Florida Department of Corrections is to provide for the religious needs and obligations of those institutionalized persons who are not able to address their religious concerns in the same fashion as a person in free society.Chaplains have always provided spiritual direction to those adjusting to the confines of prison and separation from free society.They counsel inmates through crises such as a death in the family, divorce or a life threatening hospitalization of a family member. Chaplains are involved with most aspects of a prisonerís life including education, moral reform, and family liaison.As faith-based programs gain interest as a viable rehabilitative supplement to educational, vocational and betterment programs, Chaplains and their volunteers are providing a wider menu of program options.

There were times in prison history when attending a chapel service was not optional.There was one weekly service and it was well attended because it was either mandatory or a part of release consideration.Fortunately, we are beyond those times, and the prison religion program directed by the Chaplaincy is as religiously diverse as the inmate population, and the opportunities for participation are frequent.Participation is not required so inmates involved in Chaplaincy programs do so for personal reasons.The most prominent of these is the genuine desire to make qualitative lifestyle changes to break the cycle of recidivism.The Chaplain in a Florida prison has an obligation to provide diverse religious education opportunities and in so doing, makes use of numerous citizen volunteers of many different faith communities.Increasingly, Chaplains manage religious programs that include a calendar filled with sacred text and doctrinal studies, seminars, regular and special-occasion religious services, holy days of obligation and a variety of other special events.It is often a very busy and demanding schedule. There is an increased interest in religious programming as a venue to address and provide solutions to the problems of offenders.Chaplaincy is an important part of the criminal justice process.It has grown to be a source of stability and moderation for those inmates involved in its programs.

Gross Attendance††††† Contents~TOP

It is the intention of the Office of Program, Transition and Post-release Services to quantify and evaluate the efficacy of all programs.This requires accurate measurement of inmate participation.Like many program staff, the Chaplains report regularly on the religious activities taking place under their supervision.Many of the events have large attendance numbers and are cumbersome to maintain an on-going record of participation.Additionally, the past manner of record keeping provided a gross number for attendance.This number combined the attendance of all of the various services and activities throughout the month into a single figure.The gross attendance number accurately reflects attendance records but includes every time an inmate attended a religious activity.This number may count one inmate several times in one month.With some inmates attending only a few times each month and some attending many, the gross attendance record could easily be higher than the institutions total inmate population.It did not at all indicate how many inmates do not attend any religious activities during the month.Though the gross attendance is standard in correctional institutions, it is limited in its usefulness.

Individual Inmate Participation Rate:A Better Measure
Contents~TOP

Chaplaincy Services identified an essential measure that would provide a more accurate assessment of the importance of religious programming.This essential measure is to identify the number of inmates that participate at least one time in a measurement period in a religious program in the prison.Measuring the number of different inmates that are involved in religious programming provides valuable insight into the effectiveness of a program as it pertains to the number of inmates that are impacted by religious programs.Since inmates participate in the overall program at different rates and frequencies, an accurate measurement tool will provide two measures:

a.    The effectiveness of the program as it pertains to the entire institutionís population of inmates; and

b.    The frequency of participation of individual inmates.

 

With this information, a more accurate assessment of the programs efficacy and potential impact on institutional management and individual behavior is possible.A participation measure is also needed to highlight an ineffective program that reaches an insignificant number of inmates or a program schedule that is lopsided in providing the same type of programming over and over.

Definition†††† Contents~TOP

A participation rate can be established by determining the percentage of inmates out of the total available[1]inmate population that take part in at least one religious activity per month.The inmate is only counted for those activities where inmates are required to sign-in.Each inmate is counted only once during the measurement period whether the inmate attended once or multiple times. The measurement period is one month.When the total number of inmates is compared to the total available inmate population, a rate of participation is identified.If 100 separate inmates signed into religious activities during a given month, and the total available inmate population is 1,000, then the participation rate is 100 out of 1,000 or 10%.

This Report†††† Contents~TOP

What this document contains is the result of a cooperative effort. Chaplaincy Services Administration provided a data entry tool to record the inmate attendance by name and DC number in specific categories of religious activities.Each institution submitted a monthly account of attendance at all of the sign-in activities by using a common data entry tool[2].We called this the Chaplaincy Participation Report (hereafter referred to as CPR). The Senior Chaplain at each institution returned a monthly CPR.The charts contained in the following pages are derived from the CPR sent in by the institutional Chaplains.

Preliminary Conclusions †††††Contents~TOP

Though a three-month report is preliminary, some trends are indicated and supported by the figures generated from the institutional CPR.

1.    Inmates who attend religious services get fewer disciplinary reports than inmates who do not attend religious services.This lowers the disciplinary report rate for the entire Department.

2.    Inmates who attend 10 or more religious activities per month receive disciplinary reports at a rate equal to one third that of inmates who do not attend any religious activities and at half the rate of those who attend one to three religious activities per month.This is a preliminary indication that those inmates who are more committed or sincere regarding their faith are less likely to participate in negative behavior.

3.    Religious services and activities are of interest to an average of 38.0% of the inmate population that are available for attending group activities.Considering that all religious programming is voluntary, this is an astounding rate of participation.

4.    Institutions that have a chaplain to inmate ratio of one to 500 (or less) have a higher participation rate than institutions where the ratio of inmates to chaplain is higher.This finding is an indication that the greater the opportunity the Chaplain has to interact with the inmates the more the inmates are inclined to participate in religious programming.

5.    Institutions for youthful offenders or females have a higher participation rate than institutions for adult males.Youthful offenders are generally housed in units that concur with # 4 above.

6.    Religious programming not only is an essential element to control inmate idleness, it is a cost effective means in providing a safer, more manageable environment. This has proven to be an essential element of inmate rehabilitation.

Details††††††† Contents~TOP

Chaplaincy Services distributed a measuring tool and required that Chaplains use the tool to record inmate participation over a three-month trial period.Only sign-in religious activities were measured. Chaplaincy Services programs also includes activities that do not utilize a sign-in of inmates.These include chaplain rounds to inmate housing or work locations, crisis messages and large activities held outside of the Chapel area in the open yard.This report only refers to those activities where a sign-in sheet is used.This is the majority of religious programs and activities.Not all of the 52 FDC institutions were able to participate due to a variety of reasons.Reasons for no information include:

     Vacant positions of either a Chaplain to collect the attendance figures or a Clerk/Typist to enter the figures.

     Institutions where the Chaplains do not have access to the LAN and consequently could not submit the reports in a timely manner for inclusion.

     Many of the work camps attached to the institutions were unavailable for measurement.Though work camps do have regularly scheduled religious activities, volunteers conduct most of these and inmate sign-in sheets are not used or were not available for this report.

With these stipulations, the numbers in the CPR reflect reports from the following institutions:

Apalachee CI, EU,WU

Avon Park CI,WC

Baker CI

Brevard CI

Broward CI

Calhoun CI

Century CI

Charlotte CI

Columbia CI

Cross City CI

Dade CI, Annex

Everglades CI

Florida State Prison

Gainesville CI, WC

Glades CI

Gulf CI,MU, Anx

Hamilton CI., Anx

Hernando CI

Hillsborough CI

Holmes CI. WC

Indian River CI

Jackson CI

Jefferson CI

Lancaster MU, WU

Lawtey CI

Liberty CI, Quincy Anx

Lowell CI

Marion CI

Martin CI

Mayo CI, WC

New River E, W

NFRC MU, WU

Okaloosa CI

Okeechobee CI

Polk C.I.

Putnam C.I.

River Junction

Santa Rosa C.I.

SFRC

Sumter C.I.

Tomoka CI,WC

Union CI

Wakulla CI

Walton CI,WC

Washington CI

Zephyrhills CI

 

 

 

During the measurement period the total average inmate population for the FDC was 72,157.The figures from this report are drawn from the average of 50,026 inmates in the institutions that were in open population and able to attend religious activities at major institutions.The other 22,131 inmates were in AC, CM, DC, PM, or work release and were ineligible to participate or unavailable for measurement.

Of the total number of inmates that were able to participate (50,026) in a sign-in religious activity, 38,121 inmates or 76.2% were measured for attendance at religious activities.14,609 inmates (38.3% of 38,121) attended a religious activity at least one time.The total participation rate at all of the measured institutions for the three-month study of July through September 2001 is 38.3%.

When female and youthful offender institutions are separated from the total and compared to the total, they have a higher than Statewide average with a participation rate of 58.5% for the same measurement period. Institutions with a chaplain to inmate ratio of one chaplain to five hundred or less inmates had the highest participation rate of 65.9% for the three-month period.

Figure 1

 
Chart 1 is a breakdown of the total inmate population between those who were eligible to attend religious services or activities and those who were not. Due to the dynamic nature of the population, a fixed point of measurement was used with the understanding that though this is the exact number for a specific day, it also represents a typical number for any given day during the three month measurement period.This number is derived by averaging over the three-month period the population on the last day of each month. In Chart 1, the combination of 22,131 and 50,026 reflects the entire inmate population in custody (72,157).††

The larger number (50,026) represents the number of inmates that were able to attend a religious program or activity.The smaller number (22,131) includes inmates that were in Close Management, Protective Management, Administrative Confinement, or Disciplinary Confinement on the day in which the numbers were taken. Additionally, inmates in work release were not counted.Work camp statistics were not consistent, thus only those inmates in the work camps previously listed were counted.

Chapel Tracking
Contents~TOP

The following three pages are the Chapel Tracking tables by region for July, August and September, or each month of the measuring period.Each table identifies the institution by region.The key elements of each table are (1) the open population (inmates eligible to participate in programming); (2) the number of inmates from the open population that participated in Chapel programs; and (3) the percentage of the open population that participated in Chapel programs.

The blank cells in each table are intentional, they indicate that the information for that period was not available.The various reasons for the unavailability of the information is explained in the ďDetailsĒ section.†††


July Chapel Tracking by Region††† Contents

Region I

Open Pop. 7/31/01

July Attendance

%

Region III

Open Pop. 7/31/01

July

Attendance†† %

ACI East

577

180

31%

Avon Park & WC

1166

478

41%

ACI West

659

222

34%

Brevard

870

357

41%

Calhoun

950

380

40%

CFRC East

 

 

Century

1155

382

33%

CFRC Main

 

 

Gulf Main

1205

610

51%

Hernando

 

 

Gulf Annex

1174

555

47%

Hillsborough

245

187

76%

Holmes

1435

387

27%

Lake

 

 

Jackson

1191

536

45%

Lowell

794

227

28%

Jefferson

 

 

Marion

1026

403

39%

Liberty

950

277

29%

Polk

 

 

Madison

 

 

Sumter

1129

303

27%

Okaloosa

 

 

Tomoka

1121

608

54%

Quincy Annex

352

82

23%

Zephyrhills

511

196

38%

River Junction

331

72

22%

TOTAL

5,733

2,456

42.8%

Santa Rosa

850

207

24%

 

Wakulla

1141

377

33%

 

Walton

1229

440

36%

 

Washington

801

340

42%

 

TOTAL

14,000

5,047

36.1%

 

 

Region II

Open Pop. 7/31/01

July Attendance

%

Region IV

Open Pop. 7/31/01

July Attendance

%

Baker

948

612

65%

Broward

707

394

56%

Colunbia

905

261

29%

Charlotte

879

435

49%

Cross City

713

217

30%

Dade

673

209

31%

Florida State Prison

350

124

35%

Dade Annex

944

136

14%

Gainsville

501

253

50%

Desoto Annex

 

 

Hamilton

1041

422

41%

Everglades

1366

135

10%

Hamilton Annex

1198

336

28%

Glades

852

360

42%

Lancaster Main & WC

 

 

Hardee

 

 

Lawtey

734

422

57%

Hendry

 

 

Mayo

1119

569

51%

Indian River

250

189

76%

New River E & W

 

Martin

436

65

15%

NFRC Main

275

135

49%

Okeechobee

900

388

43%

Putnam

382

210

55%

SFRC

1055

272

26%

Taylor

 

 

TOTAL

8,062

2,583

32.0%

Union

1434

302

21%

STATE TOTAL

37,249

13,949

37.4%

TOTAL

9,454

3,863

40.8%

 

 


August Chapel Tracking by Region††† Contents

 

Region I

Open Pop. 8/31/01

August Attendance

%

Region III

Open Pop. 8/31/01

AugustAttendance

%

ACI East

562

162

29%

Avon Park & WC

1152

472

41%

ACI West

694

185

27%

Brevard

875

377

43%

Calhoun

968

446

46%

CFRC East

 

 

Century

1155

406

35%

CFRC Main

 

 

Gulf Main

1167

542

46%

Hernando

427

385

90%

Gulf Annex

1071

428

40%

Hillsborough

257

205

80%

Holmes

1435

479

33%

Lake

 

 

Jackson

1146

552

48%

Lowell

773

319

41%

Jefferson

 

 

Marion

1044

461

44%

Liberty

947

221

23%

Polk

987

411

42%

Madison

 

 

Sumter

1115

242

22%

Okaloosa

 

 

Tomoka

1121

642

57%

Quincy Annex

355

111

31%

Zephyrhills

512

189

37%

River Junction

346

69

20%

TOTAL

8,263

3,703

44.8%

Santa Rosa

800

219

27%

 

 

 

 

Wakulla

1107

389

35%

 

 

 

 

Walton

1175

495

42%

 

 

 

 

Washington

838

324

39%

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

13,766

5,028

36.5%

 

 

 

 

 

Region II

Open Pop. 8/31/01

August Attendance

%

Region IV

Open Pop. 8/31/01

August Attendance

%

Baker

932

489

52%

Broward

691

466

67%

Columbia

 

 

 

Charlotte

905

412

45%

Cross City

690

379

55%

Dade

685

312

45%

Florida State Prison

350

125

36%

Dade Annex

955

165

17%

Gainesville

501

255

51%

Desoto Annex

 

 

Hamilton

1030

248

24%

Everglades

1355

433

32%

Hamilton Annex

1159

335

29%

Glades

811

416

51%

Lancaster & WC

694

210

30%

Hardee

 

 

Lawtey

705

403

57%

Hendry

 

 

Mayo

1119

571

51%

Indian River

260

248

95%

New River E & W

1522

369

24%

Martin

 

 

NFRC Main

275

104

38%

Okeechobee

898

405

45%

Putnam

411

254

62%

SFRC

1022

292

29%

Taylor

 

 

 

TOTAL

7,582

3,149

41.5%

Union

1477

274

18%

STATE TOTAL

40,476

15,896

39.3%

TOTAL

10,865

4,016

36.9%

 

 

 

 

 


September Chapel Tracking by Region††† Contents

 

Region I

Open Pop. 9/30/01

September Attendance.

%

Region III

Open Pop. 9/30/01

September

Attendance

%

ACI East

564

166

29%

Avon Park & WC

1153

ACI West

696

172

25%

Brevard

869

487

56%

Calhoun

934

392

42%

CFRC East

825

 

Century

1132

CFRC Main

1480

 

Gulf Main

1174

477

41%

Hernando

422

309

73%

Gulf Annex

1076

415

39%

Hillsborough

264

Holmes

1279

510

40%

Lake

990

 

 

Jackson

1139

510

45%

Lowell

689

157

23%

Jefferson

698

160

23%

Marion

1055

577

55%

Liberty

934

343

37%

Polk

1045

 

 

Madison

937

 

 

Sumter

1143

 

27%

Okaloosa

782

330

42%

Tomoka

1121

641

57%

Quincy Annex

362

102

28%

Zephyrhills

497

172

35%

River Junction

337

66

20%

TOTAL

5,796

2,654

46%

Santa Rosa

798

254

32%

 

 

 

 

Wakulla

1140

327

29%

 

 

 

 

Walton

1175

495

42%

 

 

 

 

Washington

829

299

36%

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

13,917

5,018

36.1%

 

 

 

 

 

Region II

Open Pop. 9/30/01

September Attendance

%

Region IV

Open Pop. 9/30/01

September Attendance

%

Baker

959

507

53%

Broward

699

389

56%

Columbia

908

 

 

Charlotte

851

550

65%

Cross City

694

273

39%

Dade

694

309

46%

Florida State Prison

350

139

40%

Dade Annex

925

117

13%

Gainesville

501

283

56%

Desoto Annex

1057

 

 

Hamilton

1006

279

28%

Everglades

1366

408

30%

Hamilton Annex

1158

284

25%

Glades

821

333

41%

Lancaster & WC

705

Hardee

772

 

 

Lawtey

730

358

49%

Hendry

513

 

 

Mayo

1119

517

46%

Indian River

260

New River E & W

1496

379

25%

Martin

439

 

 

NFRC Main & West

539

262

49%

Okeechobee

902

398

44%

Putnam

432

SFRC

994

232

23%

Taylor

826

TOTAL

7,252

2,736

37.7%

Union

1123

295

26%

STATE TOTAL

36,640

13,984

38.2%

TOTAL

9,675

3,576

36.9%

 

 

 

 

 


Percentage of Inmate Participation by Region
Contents~TOP

 

Chart 2 reflects the consistency of the average percentage of inmate participation for each month of the measurement period.The data for Chart 2 was obtained from the Chapel Tracking tables.It should be noted that Region III, though having the highest participation rate, had the fewest total number of participants.


 

August 2001
Inmate Participation by Institution Type
Contents~TOP

Variance according to institution type††† Contents~TOP

Total participation rate at all institutions for the three-month study of July-September, 2001 was 38.3%.

Female and Youthful Offender institutions averaged 58.5% of the inmates participating.This is almost 20 percentage points higher than the State average.

Smaller institutions with a Chaplain to inmate ratio of under 1/500 had the highest participation rate at 65.9%.


Institutional Adjustment:
Disciplinary Report Frequency
Contents~TOP

A measurement of inmate adjustment identifies the number of disciplinary reports (DRís) that measured inmates received during the three months that Chapel participation rates were considered.The record of inmates who attended religious activities was separated from the record of those inmates who did not attend any religious activities.Both were then analyzed as to the frequency of DRís per one thousand inmates.In the group of inmates that attended religious activities during the three-month period, they were further grouped according to the number of times they attended a religious activity in the measurement period of one month.

The number of DRís was measured for those inmates who attended religious services one to three times per month, four to nine times per month and those who attended ten or more times in a month.

Finally, a statewide average was included to compare the findings with a norm.The State norm for all inmates is 70 DRís per thousand inmates.The inmates in the measurement group (50,026) that attended no religious services computed at the rate of 88 DRís per thousand inmates.Inmates who attended from one to three religious activities during the month received 66 DRís per thousand inmates.Inmates who attended from four to nine religious activities received 48 DRís per thousand inmates.The fewest DRís per thousand were received by the inmate group that attended ten or more religious activities during the month at 29 DRís per thousand inmates.

For all three months, the more inmates attended religious activities, the fewer DRís they received.Inmates who did not attend any religious activities were three times more likely to get a DR than inmates who attended ten or more services a month did.Statewide, inmates in general were more than twice as likely to get a DR than inmates who attended ten or more religious activities per month.Though there may be a variety of reasons for getting or not getting a DR, the numbers indicate that the more an inmate attends religious activities, the odds that the inmate gets into trouble are diminished.

DRís are considered to be one of the prime indicators of institutional adjustment. The following three pages measure the institutional adjustment of inmates who participate in Chapel programs by the number of times the inmate participates and their number of DRís.This figure is then compared with the institutional adjustment of those inmates who did not participate in Chapel programs.


July Institutional Adjustment††† Contents

 

July

Total Inmates

Received DR

DR%

State Avg.

72,075

5,083

7.1%

Att. 0 times

21,363

2,001

9.4%

1-3 times

4,437

324

7.3%

4-9 times

2,004

119

5.9%

10+ times

937

37

3.9%

 

Chapel attendance at 30 institutions was measured for the month of July.†† Chart 4 reflects that inmates who attended 10 or more chapel programs a month received a DR at far less than half the rate of those who did not attend any services.

Chart 4

 

Attendance: State††††††††††† 0††††††††††††††† 1-3†† †††††††††††4-9††††††††††††† 10+
†††
††††††††††††††Average

 


August Institutional Adjustment††† Contents

 

August

Total Inmate

Received DR

DR%

State Avg.

72,187

5,106

7.1%

Att. 0 times

23,544

2,098

8.9%

1-3 times

5,401

339

6.3%

4-9 times

2,834

124

4.4%

10+ times

1,337

32

2.4%

 

Chapel attendance at 35 institutions was measured for the month of August.†† Chart 5 reflects that inmates who attended 10 or more chapel programs a month received a DR at about 1/3 the rate as the State average and about ľ the rate of those who did not attend any services.

Chart 5

 

 


September Institutional Adjustment††† Contents

September

Total Inmates

Received DR

DR%

State Avg.

72,210

4,888

6.8%

Att. 0 times

25,094

2,045

8.1%

1-3 times

5,386

337

6.3%

4-9 times

2,892

121

4.2%

10+ times

1,318

31

2.4%

 

Chapel attendance at 36 institutions was measured for the month of September.Chart 6 reflects that inmates who attended 10 or more chapelprograms a month received a DR about 1/3 the rate of the State average and the rate of those who did not attend any services

Chart 6

 

 


Statewide Measurement of Disciplinary
Reports per 1,000 inmates†† Contents~TOP

Chart 7 indicates that by using the standard measurement for DR reporting, the higher the inmate participation in Chapel programs the lower his or her personal disciplinary infractions.Participation in Chapel programs actually helps lower the state average to 70, since the average of those inmates who do not participate in any Chapel programs is 88.

Chart 7

 

Attendance:State†††††††† 0††††††††††††† 1-3†††††††††††† 4-9†††††††††††† 10+
††††††† ††††††††Average

Statewide Participation by Program Type†††† Contents~TOP

Chart 8 reflects the statewide average of inmate participation in Chapel programs during the measurement period.It should be noted that despite the variety of Chapel programs, the PWOís and RESís are by far the most popular and highly attended.The numbers in the following table are the total three-month combined attendance figures.

PWO:†††† Primary Worship Opportunity ††††††††††††††††††††††††† 23,869
RES:††††† Religious Education or Study †††††††††††††††††††††††††† 18,578
SPE:†††††† Special Events †††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† ††5,102
CWS:††††† Chapel Workshops ††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† ††1,926
SHP:†††††† Self Help Activities †††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† ††5,432
††††††††††††† †††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Total††††††††††††††††††† 54,907

Primary Worship Opportunity: Any recognized form of worship by the individual religious bodies.Catholic Mass, Christian Church Service, Jumah Prayer, Shavat, scheduled at weekly, BI-weekly or monthly intervals

Religious Education or Study: Religious Instructional Classes, Sacred Text Studies, Instructional Video Classes, Taleem.

Special Events: Special Worship Opportunities (not regularly scheduled), Holy Days of Obligation, Civic or Cultural Celebrations, Concerts.

Chapel Workshops: Marriage Enrichment Programs, Anger Management, Prison Fellowship Seminars, normally a 1 or 2 day program addressing a religious theme.

Self-Help Activities: Representing a variety of activities such as Life Skill Classes, Substance Abuse Prevention support groups, AA.

Total Number of Inmates

 
Conclusions:†††† Contents~TOP

Chaplaincy is an active part of every institution.A statewide average of 38% participation among eligible inmates indicates a significant level of institutional effectiveness.There is no question that there is inmate interest and involvement in institutional religious programs.The extent of programs and activities offered by Chaplaincy Services appears to have a more than coincidental positive effect on inmate behavior.The more religious activities offered, the greater the appeal to a wider group of inmates.With a behavioral effect evident when attendance is from four to nine times per month, it is possible to provide a significant benefit to institutional management through increased religious programming.More religious programs could be an effective tool to reduce disciplinary infractions at institutions.Additionally, as noted at institutions where there is a ratio of one chaplain to five hundred or less inmates, the participation rate is much better than the statewide norm.More Chaplains could very well be an integral element to solving the behavioral problems at institutions.††

Participation in religious programming is a voluntary act by interested inmates.As such, religious programs and activities are having a positive effect on a significant number of inmates in the FDC.

Frankly, many correctional professionals have viewed religious programming at best as simply an answer to inmate idleness. Previous studies[3], along with the findings of this study, suggest the fallacy of such reasoning.The impact of religious programming goes well beyond a simple answer to inmate idleness.Religious programming is an integral part of any professional correctional institution and may provide a cost effective management tool for reducing DRís.

Contents Ė Click Below to Go to Sections
†††† Chaplaincy Services:Preface by Chaplaincy Administrator Alex Taylor
†††† Introduction:Measuring Inmate Involvement & Consequences
††††††††† Gross Attendance
††††††††† Individual Inmate Participation Rate:A Better Measure
††††††††† Definition
~This Report
†† Preliminary Conclusions
†††† Details
~Chapel Tracking:†† July ~ August ~ September
†††† Percentage of Inmate Participation by Region
†††† August 2001 Ė Variance by Institution Type
†††† Institutional Adjustment:Disciplinary Report Frequency
††††††††† July
~August~September
†††† Statewide Measurement of Disciplinary Reports per 1,000 Inmates
†††† Statewide Participation by Program Type
†††† Conclusions††
~†† TOP

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[1] Only those inmates that are eligible and available to attend group sign-in activities.Inmates on bench warrant, or confined for disciplinary or medical reason are not available and were not counted in the total available inmate population.

[2] A form was developed using MSEXCEL and was later converted to an MSACCESS format.

[3] See the following: U.S. Department of Justice, Survey of State Prisoner, 1991, (U.S. Government Printing Office,Washington D.C., 1993), Todd R. Clear, Ph.D., et al., Prisoners, Prisons and Religion, School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University (1992). Byron R. Johnson, David B. Larson, Timothy C. Pitts, Religious Programs, Institutional Adjustment, and Recidivism Among Former Inmates in Prison Fellowship Programs, Justice Quarterly, Volume 14, No.1, March 1997. The Florida Department of Corrections, Harry K. Singletarry, Jr., Secretary, A Report of Faith-Based Programs in Correctional Facilities, December 1997. Florida House of Representatives, Committee on Corrections, Representative Allen Trovillion, Chair, Faith-Based Programs in Florida Prisons, January 1998.